10 Cars With The Worst Resale Values

10 Cars With The Worst Resale Values
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Depreciation is one of a new-car buyer’s largest long-term expenses, and savvy shoppers look for models that hold onto their value steadfastly to bring in more money at trade-in time. Resale value is especially important to those leasing a car, as monthly payments are largely based on what a vehicle will be worth two or three years down the road.

Predictions of future value for any depreciating asset, however, are essentially educated guesses, albeit ones based on assorted economic factors, historical data including used-vehicle auction values and supply and demand projections. Having already highlighted the rides that generate the highest rate of return in an earlier story, we move on to consider the other end of the spectrum, namely new cars that are expected to lose their values the quickest. This data is according to a study recently conducted by the used-vehicle website Carlypso.com, based on an analysis of over 46,000 wholesale transactions among pre-owned model-year 2015 vehicles

1. Nissan Leaf

The full-electric Leaf tops the list of models that lose their original values the quickest, as compiled by the website Carlypso.com. Rankings are based on an analysis of over 46,000 wholesale transactions among pre-owned model-year 2015 vehicles.  Already taking a hit by virtue of a $7,500 federal tax credit and recent price reductions, the Leaf’s resale value further suffers the sting of cheap gas; it’s predicted to lose 48% of its original MSRP in its first year on the road.

 

2. Dodge Charger

Full-size sedan sales are in the doldrums these days, with big trucks and SUVs picking up the slack, which helps explain why this modern-day muscle car is expected to lose 45% of its original MSRP after one year.

3. Mercedes-Benz SL-Class

Mercedes’ $84,000 flagship roadster is a truly sporty and opulent two-seater, but it bleeds money once it’s driven off the dealer’s lot, losing 41% of its original MSRP after one year.

 

4. Chevrolet Camaro

With a redesigned Camaro not being released until 2016, and a revamped Ford Mustang kicking its posterior in the meantime, 2015 models can be expected to lose 39% of its original MSRP after one year.

 

5. Kia Cadenza

It’s a nice enough ride, but Kia’s near-luxury large sedan has never resonated with buyers, with the relative few that are sold being subject to a 38% hit in resale value after one year.

 

6. Volkswagen Beetle

Where the latter-day version of VW’s iconic coupe once turned heads, it’s now just one more model on a dealer’s lot, and is further tarnished by the automaker’s diesel emissions scandal. Expect the Beetle to lose 37% of its original MSRP after one year

7. Chevrolet Express

The only truck on Calypso’s worst resale values list is Chevy’sfull-size van. Offered in cargo and passenger versions it’s a hard worker, but has been around a long time in its current version, and has since been overshadowed by newer products at Ford and Ram. It’s expected to lose 37% of its original MSRP after one year.

 

8. Mitsubishi Lancer

While sales of Mitsubishi’s crossover SUVs are growing, its passenger cars remain a tough sell, with the compact Lancer losing 35% of its original MSRP after one year

 

 

9. Kia Optima

Slotted directly below the aforementioned Cadenza in Kia’s lineup is the midsize Optima sedan; it’s roomy and comfortable, and comes powered by either of two fuel-efficient four-cylinder engines; updated for 2016, the 2015 versions are expected to lose 35% of their original MSRP after one year.

 

 

10. Cadillac CTS

Redesigned for 2014, Cadillac’s sporty midsize sedan came with many updates, including a jarringly higher price; generous sales incentives have helped ease the sticker shock, which is one reason why the CTS is expected to lose 34% of its original MSRP after one year.

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